Contents:

Homepage

Interactive Maps

Greenway Forms

Project Profiles

Greenways Defined

Blueprint for Action

Facts and Thoughts

Public Input

Staff

 

Facts and Thoughts - Environment

Ohio Greenway's Facts and Thoughts database is a collection of greenway tidbits that support greenway development.  This potpourri of greenway particulars was the product of the work of George M. Pomeroy, a doctoral student of Urban Studies at the University of Akron.

Snippet: When AEP, an Ohio-based electric company, plans to safeguard 2.2 mil. acres of tropical forest in Bolivia to offset an estimated 14.5 metric tons of atmospheric carbon over 30 years at an estimated cost of $8.8 million.
Source: Nature Conservancy
Year: 1997
Full Citation: "Double the Park, Cut the Carbon" NATURE CONSERVANCY March / April 1997

Snippet: The Chesapeake Bay jurisdictions of Md., Va., Penn.; D.C.; the US EPA, and the Chesapeake Bay Comm. are planning to protect existing riparian forests and specfically to reforest 2,010 miles of bay tributaries over the next 13 years.
Source: Nonpoint Source News-Notes
Year: 1997
Full Citation: "Nation's First Riparian Forest Buffer Goal - 2010 Miles by 2010" NONPOINT SOURCE NEWS-NOTES April / May 1997. Issue #48

Snippet: The vast majority of those interviewed felt that land conservation was an important public service. 89% felt that land conservation was a good use of public funds, and 91% said that some parts of Maryland should be left in their natural state forever.
Source: Maryland Greenways Commission
Year: 1995
Full Citation: "Attitude Survey of Maryland Residents Regarding Greenways and Open Space - Executive Summary" April 1995

Snippet: The wetlands of Congaree Bottomland Hardwood Swamp in South Carolina provide valuable water quality functions such as sediment, toxicant and excess nutrient removal. The least cost substitute for such services would be a $5 million treatment plant.
Source: Economic Impacts of Protecting Rivers, Trails and Greenway Corridors
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Caputo, Darryl F. (1979) "Open Space Pays: The Socioenvironomics of Open Space Preservation" Green Acres Program, New Jersey EPA. Morristown NJ: New Jersey Conservation Fdn.

Snippet: Stream restoration efforts along Boulder Creek in Boulder, Colorado reduced potential wastewater treatment costs significantly. This was an alternative to the construction of a nitrification tower.
Source: Economic Impacts of Protecting Rivers, Trails and Greenway Corridors
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Barnett, John (1990) Telephone conversation. Greenways Coordinator, City of Boulder, CO.

Snippet: A single isolated tree, generously supplied with water can transpire energy equivalent to five average room air conditioners running 20 hours per day, depending on the species of tree, available moisture, and evaptranspiration rates.
Source: Economic Impacts of Protecting Rivers, Trails and Greenway Corridors
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Federed, C.A. (1971) Effects of Trees in Modifying Urban Micro Climates" in TREES AND FORESTS IN AN URBANIZING ENVIRONMENT. Amherst MA: Univ. of Mass. Extension Service.

Snippet: Studies indicate that a single rural tree can intercept up to 50 pounds of particulates per year.
Source: Economic Impacts of Protecting Rivers, Trails and Greenway Corridors
Year: 1995
Full Citation: McPherson, E.G. (1991) "Economic Modelling for Large-Scale Tree Plantings" ENERGY EFFICIENCY AND THE ENVIRONMENT: FORGING THE LINK.

Snippet: The Minnesota DNR has estimated that the cost of replacing the natural floodwater storage function of wetlands is $300 per acre-foot of water.
Source: The Economic Value of Open Space: A Review and Synthesis.
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Rivers and Trails Conservation Assistance (1995) "Economic Impacts of Protecting Rivers, Trails and Greenway Corridors" Washington, DC: USDI, National Park Service.

Snippet: Only about 10% of Ohio's estimated 7 million acres of wetlands still exists; the remaining wetlands are concentrated in the northern one-third of the state.
Source: 1995 State of the Environment Report
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio Comparative Risk Project (1995) "1995 State of the Environment Report"

Snippet: Participation levels in various outdoors recreation activities has increased in recent years. Participation levels in canoeing, backpacking and tent camping, bicycling, and beach activities increased, as in a number of other activities.
Source: SCORP
Year: 1993
Full Citation: Ohio Department of Natural Resources (1993) 1993 OHIO STATEWIDE COMPREHENSIVE OUTDOOR RECREATION PLAN.

Snippet: A 1995 Ohio poll revealed that 48% of Ohioans strongly agree and 30% somewhat agree that the unmanaged growth of strip malls, shopping centers and subdivisions is all but consuming Ohio's landscape and it's go to be slowed down.
Source: EcoCity Cleveland (5)1/2
Year: 1996
Full Citation: EcoCity Cleveland (1996) September / October. p.13.

Snippet: The same poll also revealed that 81% of Ohioans felt that the state's open spaces, farmlands, and waterways are either seriously or somewhat threatened by unmanaged growth.
Source: EcoCity Cleveland (5)1/2
Year: 1996
Full Citation: EcoCity Cleveland (1996) September / October p.13.

Snippet: By 1979, the Ohio population bald eagles had dropped to a low of four breeding pairs. since the early 1980s, the population has slowly been increasing to 26 breeding pairs in 1994.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: According to the roadkill survey, the most dramatic increase in wildlife populations has been in raccoons since 1987.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Beaver, absent form Ohio for 100 years, now occupy two-thirds of the state with populations reaching up to 14,000 animals.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Extensive loss of forest, coupled with unregulated hunting led to the extirpation of wild turkeys from Ohio in 1904. From 1956 to 1963, wild turkey were transplanted in Ohio; in spring of 1994, Ohio's wild turkey population was estimated at 95,000 birds.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: In January 1994, a record number of waterfowl were counted, however some of this increase is due to species such as Canada geese, which are considered "nuisance" birds by some.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Long-term trend analysis by the Division of Wildlife at ODNR indicates significant population declines in Ohio for many grassland birds - namely upland sandpiper, bobolink, eastern meadowlark, vesper sparrow, grasshopper sparrow, and dickissel.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Increases in bird populations, such as the mourning dove, are associated with more intense land uses, such as suburban or urban land.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Only about 10% of Ohio's estimated original seven million acres of wetlands still exist; the remaining wetlands are concentrated in the northern one third of the state.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Filling and draining of wetlands directly affect ecosystems by depleting habitat, reducing wildlife, and species diversity, and increasing potential for floods.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: There are more than 60,000 dams in Ohio
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: In 1940, 3.2 million acres of Ohio were forested, in 1991 7.86 million acres were identified in the state. The type of forest, however, has changed - leading to different types of habitat.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: In 1992, 7,304,197 cars with about 29 million tires were registered in Ohio; only four other states had more registered vehicles.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: As of December 1994, there were 69 operating landfills, 6 operating incinerators, and 52 operating solid waste transfer stations in Ohio.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: In a 1995 report, the Division of Solid and Infectious Waste Management at Ohio EPA estimates that there is 8.8 to 11.7 years of publicly-available disposal capacity remaining in the state.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: There are currently 1190 known unregulated hazardous waste sites in Ohio; 35 of these are on the National Priority List commonly referred to as Superfund.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: From 1983 to 1993, the Ohio EPA received reports of 50,759 spills. The most common type of spill involved petroleum products.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: Inadequate wastewater infrastructure can result in combined sewer overflows which can seriously impact aquatic communities; there are an estimated 2,000 locations of combined sewer overflows in Ohio.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: There are between 75,000 and 80,000 underground storage tanks in Ohio; approximately 50% of all registered tanks are in 11 metropolitan counties.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: In 1990, an estimated 43% of all air pollution could be traced to mobile sources such as automobiles, buses, and trucks. In 1977 the average length of a trip to work was 9.3 miles; in 1990, the average length of the trip to work was 10.9 miles.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: In 1990, Ohio's EPA Division of Air Pollution Control had records of 5,696 stationary sources of pollution at 1,489 facilities.
Source: Ohio State of the Environment Report
Year: 1996
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1996) "Facts and Figures About Ohio's Environment" Companion to the 1995 STATE OF THE ENVIRONMENT REPORT. April.

Snippet: There are 337 state and federal endangered species in Ohio. In a 1990 poll, 84.5% of all Ohioans surveyed felt it was extremely important to set aside areas for endangered species.
Source: Comparing the Risks...Executive Summary
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1995) "Comparing the Risks of Ohio's Environmental Conditions: Executive Summary of Ohio's State of the Environment Report" December.

Snippet: In 1993 Ohio was ranked 12th in the nation in coal production and 3rd for coal consumption.
Source: Comparing the Risks...Executive Summary
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1995) "Comparing the Risks of Ohio's Environmental Conditions: Executive Summary of Ohio's State of the Environment Report" December.

Snippet: Abandoned wells, which may provide a pathway for chemicals, bacteria and viruses to get into groundwater supplies, number over 200,000 in Ohio in 1995.
Source: Comparing the Risks...Executive Summary
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1995) "Comparing the Risks of Ohio's Environmental Conditions: Executive Summary of Ohio's State of the Environment Report" December.

Snippet: Based on floodplain maps, approximately 5% of Ohio's land is at risk from extreme flooding.
Source: Comparing the Risks...Executive Summary
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1995) "Comparing the Risks of Ohio's Environmental Conditions: Executive Summary of Ohio's State of the Environment Report" December.

Snippet: In a 1988 US EPA report, it was estimated that non-point source pollution was responsible for the degradation of up to 76% of degraded lakes.
Source: Comparing the Risks...Executive Summary
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1995) "Comparing the Risks of Ohio's Environmental Conditions: Executive Summary of Ohio's State of the Environment Report" December.

Snippet: Accidents involving hazardous wastes accounted for .4% of all shipping accidents in Ohio.
Source: Comparing the Risks...Executive Summary
Year: 1995
Full Citation: Ohio EPA, Comparative Risk Project (1995) "Comparing the Risks of Ohio's Environmental Conditions: Executive Summary of Ohio's State of the Environment Report" December.

Snippet: The 1996 Ohio Water Resource Inventory shows 49.3 percent of Ohio's rivers meet the goals of the federal Clean Water Act, up from 56.6 percent in 1994. Nearly half of the 8000 miles monitored now meet the standards, up from one-third four years ago.
Source: Columbus Dispatch
Year: 1997
Full Citation: Columbus Dispatch (1997) "Nearly Half of Ohio Rivers Clean, EPA Says" reported by Randall Edwards. 6/17/97

Snippet: A state report shows that fish with "highly or extremely elevated levels of contaminants" have been found in nearly 20 of the stream and river segments sampled by the Ohio EPA since 1994. The main pollutants were PCBs, mercury and lead.
Source: Cleveland Plain Dealer
Year: 1997
Full Citation: Cleveland Plain Dealer (1997) "Contaminated Fish Still Common in Ohio" by Bill Sloat. 6/21/97.

Snippet: Nature's economic "value" is estimated at $33 trillion per year, when considering the goods and services provided by ecosystems. This is greater than the world's combined gross domestic product, which is valued at $18 trillion.
Source: Common Ground. 8(5)
Year: 1997
Full Citation: COMMON GROUND (1997) "Small Tracts" July/August.

 

Questions or comments about this website? Send mail to:  webmaster@ohiogreenways.org
Copyright © 2017 Ohio Greenways, Last modified: January 27, 2017